The Sex Diaries – -The Trader Who Will Fly for Sex – New York Magazine


Portrait by Matthew Woodson

DAY ONE
12:30 p.m. I dash to JFK. I am on one of my MFM swinging adventures tonight, flying to one of our finest flyover states. I have Adult Friend Finder to thank.

12:31 p.m. My swinging M.O. is simple: Exchange recent pics of him and her. Talk on the phone. Set a date. Fly. Fuck like mad. Return to NYC. When it works, it is a very efficient way to get hot, no-strings-attached sex.



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The Sex Diaries – A Critical Reading of New Yorkers’ Sexual Habits & Anxieties — New York Magazine


From left: The Car Salesman in a Relationship With an Older Woman, 32, Brooklyn Heights; The Temporarily Celibate Actress, 23, Astoria; The Single Brooklyn Bartender, 23, Williamsburg; The Mailroom Worker in an On-Again-Off-Again Relationship, 35, Upper West Side.Photo: Joshua Allen; Grooming by Bryan Lynde

So there’s this iPhone app called Grindr. It’s a GPS-enabled social-networking service for gay men. It tells you how many feet away a possible hookup is standing. Each profile comes with a picture, a tagline, the relevant stats, and a declaration of interest. You scroll through a column of heads and torsos arranged in descending order of proximity, tapping on the ones that seem promising and chatting with the ones who want the same things you do. As you make your way through the city, the menu of men reshuffles, and the erotic terrain updates in real time.

Has the search for erotic gratification ever been so efficient? Until recently, being a cad or coquette took a lot of work: You needed to buy a little black book, and you had to go around filling it, and then you had to schedule your calls for a time when the target of your seduction was likely to be at home. The less-self-assured daters in New York faced the sickening anxiety of the first phone call, or the cold approach in the bar. There were palliatives designed to help people cope—the newspaper personal ads, the paid dating services, the dirty videos and magazines—but they were generally understood to be the province of weirdos and losers.



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The Sex Issue – A Roundtable of Pickup Artists — New York Magazine


Ink & Oil (2002), by Lars Hübner.Photo: Courtesy of Lars Hübner

The Panel:

The Sex Issue - A Roundtable of Pickup Artists -- New York Magazine
Photo: Portraits by Joel Kimmel

The seduction community began online with guys sharing tips on how to pick up women in bars. How has the art of the pickup changed with massive online-dating and hookup apps?



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Date Ideas for Every Couple — New York Magazine


“Rain Room” at MoMA.Photo: Kristin McDonnell

A Rendezvous for Every Couple

The Lower East Side Avant-Gardists
Crash happy hour ($2 beers, $3 grilled cheese) at gallerista bar Café Dancer* (96 Orchard St., nr. Broome St.; 212-677-1808). Listen to ambient noise at salonlike music space Spectrum* (121 Ludlow St., nr. Delancey St., second fl.; spectrumnyc.com).

The Harlem Historians
Explore the sites of “Activist East Harlem” with a Museum of the City of New York* walking tour (call 917-492-3395 for more info). Revel in live jazz and Harlem Mules at Ginny’s Supper Club (310 Lenox Ave., nr. 125th St.; 212-421-3821).



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Martine Rothblatt Is the Highest-Paid Female CEO in America. She Was Also Born Male. — New York Magazine


(Photo: Peter Hapak/New York Magazine)

Only about 5
percent of the companies in the Fortune 500 are run by women; double the sample size, and the proportion is the same. Compensation levels for female CEOs appear to lag as well, though it’s hard to tell because there are so few of them. On a recent list of America’s 200 highest-paid CEOs, only 11 were women, and their median pay was $1.6 million less than their male peers. Certain of these women are already household names: Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer, No. 34 on the list, who earned $25 million last year, and Hewlett-Packard’s Meg Whitman, No. 95, who earned $18 million. But the highest-paid female CEO in America is not nearly as well known. She is Martine Rothblatt, the 59-year-old founder of United Therapeutics—a publicly traded, Silver Spring, Maryland–based pharmaceutical company—who made a previous fortune as a founder of Sirius radio, a field she entered as an attorney specializing in the law of space. But what’s really extraordinary about Rothblatt’s ascent is not that she has leaned in, or out, or had any particular thoughts about having it all. What sets Rothblatt apart from the other women on the list is that she—who earned $38 million last year—was born male.

“It’s like winning the lottery,” Rothblatt said happily, about seeing her name atop the list, during one of the meetings I had with her this summer. But Rothblatt could not be less interested in establishing herself as a role model for women. “I can’t claim that what I have achieved is equivalent to what a woman has achieved. For the first half of my life, I was male,” she said.

In person, Martine is magnificent, like a tall lanky teenage boy with breasts. She wears no makeup or jewelry, and she inhabits her muted clothing—cargo pants, a T-shirt, a floppy button-down thrown on top—in the youthful, offhand way of the tech elite. Martine is transgender, a power trans, which makes her an even rarer species in the corporate jungle than a female CEO. And she seems genuinely to revel in her self-built in-betweenness. Just after her sex-reassignment surgery in 1994, her appearance was more feminine than it is today—old photos show her wearing lipstick, her long, curly hair loose about her shoulders. But in the years since she has developed her own unisexual style. She is a person for whom gender matters enough to have undergone radical surgery, but not enough to care whether she’s called he or she by people, like her 83-year-old mother, who occasionally lose track of which pronoun to use.

What she prefers to be called is “Martine.” To her four young grandchildren she is “Grand Martine.” Bina Aspen, the woman who married Martine 33 years ago, when Martine was a man, and remains her devoted wife, calls herself not straight or gay but “Martine-sexual”—as in the only person she wants to have sex with is Martine. Together Martine and Bina have four children, and they refer to Martine as “Martine” in conversations with strangers. At home, they call her “Dad.”

In 1995, just after her transition, Martine published The Apartheid of Sex, a slim manifesto that insisted on an overhaul of “dimorphic” (her word) gender categories. “There are five billion people in the world and five billion unique sexual identities,” she wrote. “Genitals are as irrelevant to one’s role in society as skin tone. Hence, the legal division of people into males and females is as wrong as the legal division of people into black and white races.” Instead, she suggested, people might better express their gender and sexual identities on a spectrum, perhaps in terms of color: Green might be “an equally aggressive/nurturing person who does not try to appear sexy” (lime green someone a little less aggressive), and purple someone gentle, nourishing, and erotic in equal measure.





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Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores — New York Magazine


First Look
In August, Swedish menswear designer Stephen F brings turquoise suits and hand-sewn suede shoes to his first Stateside shop (829 Washington St.).

Illustration by Jason Lee  

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Accessories bar: leather ties ($160); green suede belts ($150).
2. Downstairs: personal shopping, with a sofa and coffee table.
3. Drawings: artist illustrations of the fall-winter collection ($300).
4. Shoe rack: classic suede loafers ($390); velvet tuxedo shoes ($600).
5. Outerwear: reindeer-leather jacket with removable fur collar ($6,000), worn by Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist.
6. Colorful suits: matching lavender shorts ($285) and blazers ($1,300), worn by Alan Cumming at the Tonys.


2×2: Popsicle Molds
Make your own FrozFruits.

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Push:

6-Year-Old’s Party:
Silikomart 3-piece ice-pop mold, $22 at Amazon.com.
36-Year-Old’s Party: Classic push-up-pop mold, $15 at Willams-Sonoma.com.

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Don’t Push:
6-Year-Old’s Party: Ring-jewel ice-pop mold, $12 for six at Uncommongoods.com.
36-Year-Old’s Party: Stainless-steel ice-pop mold, $45 for six at Thetickletrunk.com.


Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine
Illustration by Murphy Lippincott  

Ask a Shop Clerk
Grande dame decorator Bunny Williams unites all nine of her lines under one roof for the first time (232 E. 59th St.).

How do you decorate around your two dogs? They sleep on leopard-print faux-fur WallyBeds, which don’t show dirt, and sheepskin rugs that I put on the seats of my chairs — the dogs just love those. I’ll also wrap my beige sofa cushions with antique textiles to protect the furniture. Their water bowl is an 18th-century Chinese fish bowl because if I have to look at a dog bowl, it better be pretty.


Three in One
Brit Stephanie McDermott’s The Vale Collective has new-to-the-city clothing and local art and coffee (113 N. 7th St., Williamsburg).

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Snack: Birch coffee, roasted in Long Island City ($3.50); Dough pastries, baked in Manhattan ($3); outdoor garden seating for 20 with couches, outlets, and Wi-Fi.

Shop: Spanish Bless the Mess blazers ($340); Italian book clutches ($500); French Chatelles slippers ($238); British vintage ’80s suede jackets ($590).

Look: Costanza Theodoli-Braschi’s Micropoems in micronib pen (from $2,000); Carlos Valencia’s pencil works ($1,500).


Micromarket
Shops (and one portable library) for hyperniche books.

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine
From left: The Free Black Women’s Library, One Grand.  

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

One Grand: A selection of “desert island” books picked by big names — Tilda Swinton chose Owning Your Own Shadow, by Robert Johnson ($13) — taking over the second floor at Whisper Editions through September (8 Fulton St.).

Pioneer Works: Novels by Pioneer Works’ resident artists, like David Colosi’s Miss Pumpernickel Bread ($20) (289 Van Brunt St.; 718-596-3001).

Archestratus Books: Food-focused texts, including Roman Food Poems, by Alistair Elliot ($20) (160 Huron St.; soft opening in August).

The Free Black Women’s Library: Works by black female authors, carried by suitcase: Parable of the Sower, by Octavia E. Butler; Sister Outsider, by Audre Lord (roving; Facebook.com/FreeBlackWomansLibrary).


Top Five
TenThousandThings designer David Rees picks his favorite items from the jewelry brand’s new concept store — its first brick-and-mortar with (much) more than just earrings and necklaces (7 Harrison St.).

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“We’re selling our friend Gregory Parkinson’s 28-ounce espadrilles ($125) exclusively. That’s very thick for denim.”

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“We casted a rock for a sculpture in the store, and I thought it would make a great planter ($175), so I carved out the inside.”

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“My co-owner Ron Anderson got these rare black opals ($3,860) from a family in Australia. The free-form composition of the ring is special.”

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“These Strange Invisible fragrances from Venice, California ($265), are just like our jewelry — made using all organic processes.”

Popsicle Molds, Hyperniche Books, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“These sculptural bronze pieces ($850) are the first 3-D objects Ron designed that aren’t jewelry. People put them on their bedside table.”



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Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores — New York Magazine


How to Remove a Stain From Your Air Jordans
Three tips from Michael Curtis of the new sneaker-restoring Retro Revivals USA (831 Flatbush Ave.).

Illustration by Jason Lee  

1. Use a pencil eraser: “People often come in for a cleaning before they go out for the night. I start by lightly brushing the scuffed area with a pencil eraser.”

2. Watch the chemicals: “Stronger stain removers like OxiClean can peel synthetic leather. You can dip a toothbrush in 1 cup of water, ¼ cup of Resolve, and a squirt of dish liquid.”

3. Dry as you go: “Cleaning solution carrying leftover dirt sinks into the thread crevices, so dry off each section with a white towel before it can drip.”


Moving In
Moschino creative director Jeremy Scott just opened the brand’s first boutique here (73 Wooster St.).

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine
Illustrations by Murphy Lippincott (portrait) and Jason Lee (bag kiosk)  

“Since my first day as creative director last November, I knew I wanted the store to have super-high ceilings and as few beams as possible, so that I could have space for things like these pairs of four-foot stilettos — one is filled with display shelves for shoes, and the pointed toe of another is a seat. There are giant bags and hats that double as shelving for the actual bags and hats. There’s a 12-foot mannequin wearing a supersize black-and-white dress from pre-fall ($1,895). She was sculpted in Italy; I can’t wait to meet her.”


First Look
On August 20, more than ten years after it was first conceived, the aquarium-themed SeaGlass Carousel ($5 per ride) will open at The Battery.

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: WXY Architecture + Urban Design)

Riders sit inside 30 bioluminescent fiberglass fish of 12 different species (including angel and blue discus), created by set designer George Tsypin.

The 35-foot-tall spiraling structure mirrors a chambered nautilus; 77 lights and projectors splash watery film onto its walls.

Fish rotate on four turntables, which circulate in varying directions to simulate the natural movement of fish in an aquarium.

SiriusXM’s in-house composer, Teddy Zambetti, wrote an original classical-music soundtrack for the three-and-a-half-minute ride.


2×2: Foldable Bike Helmets
Collapse and go.

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

$100:
Compact: Overade Plixi, $100 at Priority Bicycles (174 Hudson St.); folds down to 5 inches.
Really Compact: Morpher, $100 at igg.me/at/morpher; folds down to 1.4 inches.

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Over $100:
Compact: Brooks England Carerra, $170 at backcountry.com; folds down to 5.5 inches.
Really Compact: Closca Fuga, $130 at closca.co; folds down to 2.36 inches.


Three in One
Gabriel Vitol quit his finance job to open Fido’s Retreat, a 4,000-square-foot, application-required doggy resort in Downtown Brooklyn (230 Livingston St.; 718-522-0422).

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Hotel: “Guests” sleep on elevated cots in private suites or one big shared room (from $65); a staffer stays overnight on a camping cot so dogs are never alone.

Spa: Hydromassage bubble baths for stressed, arthritic, or injured dogs (from $75); mini groom packages include hair, nail, and pad trims, ear-hair removal, gland expression (dog owners will know what this is), and a blow-dry (from $60).

Fitness: Jungle gyms with ramps, stairs, and tunnels ($50 per day); a 75-foot-long dog run; sunshine-mimicking LED lighting to trick dogs into thinking they’re outside.


Top Five
Andrew Kevelson, the buyer behind Baxter & Liebchen’s mid-century Scandinavian furniture and décor, picks out favorites from the new Tribeca flagship (50 Laight St.; 212-431-5050).

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This early-production Arne Jacobsen swan chair (price upon request) is made with wooden legs, from the era before they switched to metal.”

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“When you roll away the round door on the side of this atomic teak desk ($3,500), there’s a double-decker lazy Susan. It also has a display shelf in back.”

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This Hvidt and Mølgaard settee ($8,000) matches chairs that sat across from Don Draper’s desk on the first season of Mad Men.”

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This green-glass hanging lamp ($1,100) is just 12 inches across, so it’s the perfect accent light. I would drop it low over an end table.”

Foldable Bike Helmets, Scandinavian Furniture, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“Hans Olsen designed this chair-slash-desk ($8,000) thinking of King Frederik, who used to sit facing backward.”



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Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores — New York Magazine


First Look
In October, the Brooklyn Yoga Club debuts in a Clinton Hill brownstone (206 Vanderbilt Ave.), with a co-working space and café.

Illustration by Jason Lee  

1. Test kitchen: Monthly Indian-cooking classes with chef Nandini Sharma that end with a banquet ($120).
2. Wall art: Paintings by Julian Schnabel, a student at the school’s former home in Soho.
3. Library: Yoga books — like Yoga: An Architecture of Peace — for in-house perusing.
4. Café: Concentrated beet juices ($4); afternoon tea with vegan-cheese plates ($12).
5. Co-working: Shared tables, wooden swings, and Wi-Fi for a $45 monthly fee.
6. Outdoor deck: Flower garden with seating area; planted herbs like basil, mint, and coriander to be used in the café.
7. Meditation room: Mindfulness and Vipassana-meditation classes (by donation).*
8. Locker rooms: Eucalyptus steam room, showers, and bathrooms.
9. Yoga studio and event space: Ashtanga-yoga and yoga-therapy classes ($23) and “consciousness-hacking” nights ($20).


2×2: Triangular Desk Lamps
Three sides, one bulb.

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor (cartwheel lamp); Clemens Kois/Courtesy of Sean Gerstley (table lamp))

Tall:

Natural:
Cartwheel lamp by Nolin Teh, $52 at Designation.co.
Colorful: Table lamp by Katie Stout and Sean Gerstley, $2,800 at Johnson Trading Gallery.

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Short:

Natural:
Wedge lamp by Noah Burton, $190 at Leantolights.com.
Colorful: Fundamental lamp by Brendan Timmins, $160 at Sightunseen.com.


Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Moving In
This month, Nicolas Busnel brings his Côte d’Azur lingerie line Maison Close to 32 Grand Street.

“My sheer mesh catsuits ($200) and lace thongs with detachable collars ($65) are for an androgynous super-vixen. The store was designed to look like my house in Cassis, with purple curtains, a sofa, and metallic gold accents. I’m planning on having days where customers can come in and design completely custom handmade lingerie, and I’ll close all the curtains.”


Store in a Store
Last week, Burberry unveiled a scarf bar in its newly redesigned Soho store (131 Spring St.).

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Talk it out: Specialists equipped with iPads greet customers at the scarf counter, guide them through the customization process, and offer styling tips on wrapping techniques and what’s trending in the scarf world.
2. Pick a color: Customers choose among 30 new scarf (from $450) and monogram ($75) colors, including purple, fuchsia, three shades of blue, and patterns like polka dot; scarves can be monogrammed with up to three letters in two sizes.
3. See it off to Britain: Each cashmere scarf is woven on a loom in Elgin or Ayr, Scotland. It’s then either monogrammed in Britain and shipped to New York within ten days or, if not monogrammed, taken home from the store that day.


Ask a Shop Clerk
Photographer Adrian Wilson just opened the Inutilious Retailer (151 Orchard St.), a store that doesn’t sell anything.

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine
Illustration by Murphy Lippincott  

If you can’t actually buy clothes, how does the store work? It’s like an indoor Burning Man–slash–Occupy Wall Street. When you walk in, you’ll see street artist Adam Cost and ENX’s wheatpaste installation next to shirts and dresses that I bought from Urban Outfitters and Forever 21 but printed with images of eagles and South African patterns using my collection of 1880s trademark stamps. A tag might say that a skirt is $50, but there will be no one there to take your money. I’ll say, “You can just have it, but you have to make something in return.” In the second room, I’ll have blank clothing and will teach you how to use the stamps, so that you can customize something. In exchange for your “purchase,” your creation will go “on sale” in the front.


Top Five
World Market, purveyor of affordable global goods, just opened its first shop in New York City (620 Sixth Ave.). Merchandise manager Kimberly Yant picks out her favorite hanging lamps and faux-agate tables.

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“These antique wood rolling pins ($8 each) were once used in India to make chapati bread. We added a coat of lacquer to make decorative pieces.”

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“It took us a long time to find Moroccan tea glasses ($6 each) that passed U.S. health codes. We worked with a factory there to get these for us.”

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This lotus lamp ($80) has a great brassy finish and hand-hammered edges. I’d hang it in a hallway or over a small dining table.”

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“The Turkish pattern is heat-transferred onto this velvet pillow ($30), so you can feel the rich texture and not just the plastic printed over it.”

Burberry’s New Scarf Bar, Triangular Desk Lamps, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This side table ($100) is meant to look like it’s agate. We had a vendor paste a decal over glass; the way the light shines through looks so realistic.”

*An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that Brooklyn Yoga Club charges for meditation classes. The classes are available by donation only.



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Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores — New York Magazine


First Look
This October, Restoration Hardware unveils a contemporary-furniture collection, RH Modern, at its 935 Broadway store.

Illustration by Jason Lee  

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Seating: Alfieri chairs ($3,995); Morgan Barrelback–designed armchairs ($449).
2. Lighting: Van Thiel–designed spire chandeliers ($3,595).
3. Tables: Suspended-drawer side tables ($895).
4. Rugs: Ben Soleimani rugs ($1,495 for a five-by-seven).
5. Staircase: Mirrored, with iron handrails inspired by Carlo Scarpa.
6. Bedroom: High-panel four-poster beds (from $4,795).
7. Traditional collection: Top two floors for standbys like Russian-oak coffee tables ($1,695).


2×2: Woolly Vases
Prepare your succulents for sweater weather.

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

For Plants:

Under $35:
Felted plant pod, $21 at etsy.com/shop/theyarnkitchen.
Over $35: Fur basket, $50 at karentinney.com.

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: From left: Courtesy of the vendor; Courtesy of Maiami)

For Flowers:

Under $35:
Bobby’s vase cover, $32 at woolandthegang.com.
Over $35: Knitted mohair vase, $49 at foundersandfollowers.com.


Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine
Illustration by Murphy Lippincott  

Ask a Shop Clerk
Jane Van Cleef just opened a Gowanus shop for her handmade, organic doll line, Hazel Village (510 Third Ave.).

Do the animals have a backstory? They are all part of a utopian society, like the utopian societies upstate in the 19th century. There’s Owen Fox, Zoe Rabbit, and Phoebe Fawn (from $34), who are made out of organic fleece and wear interchangeable pieces like flower crowns ($6) and apple-picking outfits ($26). We sew all their clothes here. It sounds funny for them to be in Gowanus, but our market lines up with the people who shop at the Whole Foods a few blocks away.


Moving In
Steven Ditchkus has reopened and expanded the formerly hidden oddities shop The Hunt at 27 Canal Street.

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“My partner Jake Lamagno and I started as a secret antiques shop in the back of another store on the Lower East Side three years ago, but now, with our own store, we’re bringing in new things that complement the old pieces. Everything’s not thrown in one big pile like most antiques stores nowadays; it has a cleaner vibe. The hand-forged kitchen knives by Zachary Fish (from $200) are displayed alongside contemporary-art objects like a 3-D-printed tiger skull dipped in 24-carat gold ($7,500). There’s also room for our taxidermy, like the full-size black bear we remounted on a piece of marble and reclaimed wood and put into a 150-year-old antique display case ($19,000). We left the 100-year-old decaying paint on the front window and kept the old electronics-store sign that was here before us because, even though we have a storefront, we want to be disguised.”


How It’s Made
The fragrance-customizing Osmologue robot debuts in October with French perfumer Ex Nihilo’s outpost in Bergdorf Goodman (754 Fifth Ave.).

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Customers choose one of eight existing perfumes for the base scent and one of three additional raw materials, like iris pallida or vanilla bourbon, to personalize a new fragrance (from $365).

2. The Osmologue weighs and distributes the chosen ingredients in a beaker.

3. An expert puts the beaker onto a magnetic plate and emulsifies the liquid for one minute.

4. The finished fragrance is funneled into a glass bottle, which can be capped with a choice of onyx, buffalo horn, or mother-of-pearl.

5. Customers may use the perfume immediately, but Ex Nihilo recommends letting it rest for up to ten days, after which the mixture will finish settling and each scent will be expressed to its full potential.


Top Five
Monica Khemsurov, editor of the design magazine Sight Unseen, picks color-changing ashtrays and brass lighter holsters from Tetra (shop-tetra.com), a new online store dedicated to stylish smoking accoutrements.

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This ashtray ($800) is cut from dichroic glass, which changes color in the light, symbolizing the shift in feeling before and after you smoke.”

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This beehive smoker ($90) has all the functions of a pipe: a small carb hole, a bigger hole to smoke from, and an indentation on top for tobacco.”

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This snuff box ($280) is handmade from solid lapis and has a brass trim. It looks like something vintage, but less boho and without the chips.”

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This vegetable-tanned-leather pouch ($190) is meant to be worn as a necklace which you can use to carry small smoking accessories.”

Woolly Vases, Color-Changing Ashtrays, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This patinated-brass lighter cover ($180) elevates the everyday Bic, so you don’t have to buy a Zippo and worry about refilling it.”



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Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores — New York Magazine


First Look
Microsoft will open its first flagship store — five stories, six years in the making — on October 26 (677 Fifth Ave.).

Illustration by Jason Lee  

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Answer desks: Complimentary PC tune-ups; personal training for all Microsoft software and hardware.
2. Community center: Two 30-person theaters for Girls Who Code classes and NFL-player talks.
3. Video games: Xbox One (from $350) with games like Halo ($50) to play on video walls with surround sound.
4. Video screen: A massive Microsoft monitor — 30 feet and two stories tall — displays new products like the Microsoft Band 2 fitness band ($250).
5. Laptops: Microsoft Surface Books ($1,499) and Lenovo ThinkPad touchscreens ($1,099).
6. Phones: Lumia 950 ($550) and 950 XL ($650), the first to support Windows 10 software.
7. Tablets: Surface Pro 4 (from $899) available for the first time on opening day.


2×2: Sophisticated Halloween Candy
Trick or treat for the Goop set.

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Sweet:

Reese’s alternative:
Unreal milk-chocolate peanut-butter cups, $5 per bag at Whole Foods.
Starburst alternative: Torie & Howard assorted-flavors fruit chews, $5 per bag at torieandhoward.com.

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendors)

Savory-sweet:

Reese’s alternative:
Wild Ophelia smoked-salt peanut-butter cups, $4 at Gourmet Garage.
Starburst alternative: Flaver popcorn candies, $14 per case at flavercandies.com.


Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Moving In
On November 24, Jean-Marc Gaucher, the CEO of French ballet-inspired brand Repetto, will open its first Stateside shop (400 W. Broadway).

“We were thinking about the days when we would custom-design shoes for Brigitte Bardot and Serge Gainsbourg. The store presents our first line of heels, which includes the fringed Virgin Tutu ($895), with ’60s-inspired ostrich feathers. We’ll still have the ballet flats that we’re known for — there will be an atelier where people can customize them in 250 colors — and the rest of the shop is ballet-inspired, too. We’ll also have taffeta skirts and shop clerks who are professional dancers.”


Three in One
Astoria’s new Chateau Le Woof (30-02 14th St.) is a pet shop that offers happy hour for dogs and also a café for humans.

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

1. Eat: Single-origin La Colombe drip coffee ($2), and tuna niçoise salads ($9) and hummus-avocado sandwiches ($7) packaged off-site and served at a countertop café.
2. Feed: Weruva gluten-free canned steak-frites ($2.50) and the Honest Kitchen’s Icelandic catfish-skin dog treats ($13) in an outdoor faux-grass-covered dog dining area.
3. Play: In-store doggy frolicking from seven to eight every evening (from $3) and weekend birthday parties (from $35 per hour), plus private training sessions (prices vary by trainer).


Deconstruction
Launching in November: the $995 flat-pack Campaign sofa (campaignliving.com).

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

Velcro-bound pure-­cotton covers are layered with foam, for easy cleaning or switching among five color options.

Back cushions have a 50-50 mixture of pillowlike down and supportive polyester.

A no-tools-necessary assembly allows for the couch to be broken down and rebuilt in minutes, should you be moving into a new apartment.

The recyclable-steel inner frame, manufactured by the company that creates Tesla parts, connects the arms, back, and base like Legos.

Seat cushions are filled with a high-density, sag-resistant, two-pounds-per-cubic-foot polyurethane foam.

Solid maple legs and straight lines are inspired by American mid-century furniture.


Top Five
Wanderlustre (419 Court St., Carroll Gardens) carries scrap-metal birds and shell-covered chests that Katy Grogan Ivanfy finds in her travels.

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“A street artisan who works in a parking lot in Johannesburg makes these metal bird sculptures (from $200). They look glamorous, which is ironic considering their origins.”

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This quilted patchwork flag ($700) was made by the Fante Asafo community in Ghana. I think it would be cool thrown over a chair or hung on the wall in a kids’ room.”

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“This Kuba box ($950) is encrusted with beads and cowrie shells. I’ve been scanning the internet for another one, but I haven’t been able to find anything like it.”

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“The underside of this chandelier ($960) has a star pattern, so the light shines through little tiny holes that have a textured effect.”

Sophisticated Halloween Candy, a Pet Shop With a Human Café, and More New Stuff in New York Stores -- New York Magazine

(Photo: Courtesy of the vendor)

“A combination of two of my favorite things: gemstones and fragrance soap (from $12). The pink looks like rose quartz and smells like grapefruit.”



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